As of January 29, 2013, the Canadian visa offices in Detroit and Seattle are closed and their backlog will be transferred to the Canadian visa offices in New York or Los Angeles.

The Canadian Embassy in Washington, D.C. will stop processing Temporary Resident Permit (TRP), Rehabilitation, Authority to Return to Canada (ARC) and Permanent Resident Travel Document (PRTD) applications. All of these pending applications will be transferred immediately to New York for continued processing.  New applications should now be submitted to either New York or Los Angeles.

Effective immediately, NEW U.S. and Canada-based Temporary Resident Visa (TRV), Study Permit, and Work Permit applications can be submitted online or to the appropriate visa office.

All applications sent to these visa offices with a postmark after February 5, 2013 will be returned to sender.

So, where should you send your application?

The Following Types of Applications Should Be Sent to New York:

  • New Work Permit applications
  • New TRP, Rehabilitation, ARC, and PRTD applications
  • In-process Permanent Resident applications from Detroit
  • New TRV applications

The Following Types of Applications Should Be Sent to Los Angeles

  • New Study Permit applications
  • US-based Family Members of Protected Persons applications
  • US-based Dependent of a Live-in Caregiver applications
  • US-based Adoption (Citizenship and Permanent Residence) applications
  • US-based One-Year Window applications
  • In-process Permanent Resident applications from Seattle
  • New TRV applications

Staying in Detroit, Seattle, or Washington D.C.:

In-process TRV, Study Permit, and Work Permit applications

If you have any individual questions or concerns, please contact our office for more customized consultation for your unique situation.  Please note that this posting is for general information only and is not to be considered binding or official legal counsel since situations will vary and can be complicated. The content in this post is current as of the day of entry. Due to the changing nature of Immigration law, the information in this entry may or may not still be applicable.

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