Passport Program – Two new requirements are now in force when applying for a passport

Canadian PassportOn October 20, 2014, new requirements came into effect for adults who are applying for a passport using the general application process.

1. Supporting identification document

The new requirements state that the federal or provincial/territorial identification document (ID) submitted to support identity must contain not only the applicant’s given name, surname and signature, but also the applicant’s sex, date of birth and a photo. If they are unable to meet the requirements with a single piece of supporting ID then additional pieces of ID, which when combined fulfil the requirements, may be accepted.

Municipal/local identification documents will no longer be accepted to support identity.

Also, Old Age Security (OAS) cards issued prior to 2008 and Social Insurance Number (SIN) cards are no longer accepted. For more information please see: Directive on Social Insurance Number

2. Name requirement

Under the new requirements, passports are issued in the same name that is on the proof of Canadian citizenship for all children under 16. For adult applicants, there are a few specific exceptions to the new requirements.

If applying for a passport and your surname has changed in the context of a relationship, the new policy requires that you also submit one of the following:

  • a marriage certificate;
  • common-law relationship certificate;
  • court order (separation/divorce);
  • certificate to dissolve a registered common-law relationship; or
  • a resumption of surname certificate.

If the applicant or child has had a legal name change, they must first obtain an updated proof of Canadian citizenship to reflect the new legal name.

For more information on these new requirements, please visit our web pages:  Personal information  and Documents to support identity.

If you have any individual questions or concerns, please contact our office for more customized consultation for your unique situation.  Please note that this posting is for general information only and is not to be considered binding or official legal counsel since situations will vary and can be complicated. The content in this post is current as of the day of entry. Due to the changing nature of Immigration law, the information in this entry may or may not still be applicable.

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